The UBC English Students' Association. Whether you're Lit or Lang, a Major or Minor, we're here for you.
“Such dread as only children can feel”: Childhood trauma in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre

“Such dread as only children can feel”: Childhood trauma in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre

“For me,” Jane begins, following the incident in the red room, “the watches of that long night passed in ghastly wakefulness; ear, eye, and mind alike strained by dread: such dread as children only can feel” (Brontë 20). Saturated as Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre is with unnerving or unsettling sensations, what...
The Power of Texts and Images in My Chemical Romance’s The Black Parade

The Power of Texts and Images in My Chemical Romance’s The Black Parade

NB: The metaphors are shown in capital letters as indicated by Barbara Dancygier and Eve Sweetser’s Figurative Language (2014) text. For every song a musical artist publishes, the artist creates an album cover art to represent the theme and messages conveyed in the music. In The Black Parade (2006) album, written and sung by the American...
Be Still: Slowing Down to Savour Life

Be Still: Slowing Down to Savour Life

“When we lose our sense of wonder we become dissatisfied with who we are,” Madeleine L’Engle says in her book on creation and human identity (Madeleine 51). When I came back to her words this month, I connected just as strongly to them as I had the first time I...
The Polar Express: The Train You Need to Ride Every Year

The Polar Express: The Train You Need to Ride Every Year

Many of Chris Van Allsburg’s books have been projected into a motion picture film such as Zathura (2005) and Jumanji (1995). Van Allsburg’s most memorable book to film project is The Polar Express(1985) which has gained the status of being a Christmas film played each year like Frosty the Snowman (1969) and Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964). But...
“You, Who Have Devastated the Souls of the Living”: Heroes, Hubris, and the Victorian Gothic in Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas and Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

“You, Who Have Devastated the Souls of the Living”: Heroes, Hubris, and the Victorian Gothic in Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas and Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

Although Christmas time and ghost stories seem to us strange bedfellows, the two were commonly found lying together in the nineteenth century. Ghouls and ghosts, seances and mystics, changelings and revenants were all immensely popular among the Victorians – and their presence was felt year-round in high society. Christmas was...
Transgressive social mobility in Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood”

Transgressive social mobility in Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood”

“Once upon a time, deep in the heart of the country,” begins Charles Perrault, “there lived a pretty little girl whose mother adored her, and her grandmother adored her even more. This good woman made her a red hood like the ones that fine ladies wear when they go riding....
LITERATURE TO LIFE: WE EAT TOO MANY PAPER PLATES

LITERATURE TO LIFE: WE EAT TOO MANY PAPER PLATES

Thinking beyond ourselves has become a dominant theme in my Canadian Environmental writing course that influences my decisions on a day-to-day basis. It is annie ross’ collection of poems from Pots and Other Living Beings(2019) that inspires me to reflect on my consumption of food, clothing, and other materialistic items. I...
Literature to Life: Three Timeless Must-Know Gift-Giving Tips You Need

Literature to Life: Three Timeless Must-Know Gift-Giving Tips You Need

From my previous post “Literature to Life: We Eat Too Many Paper Plates,” I analyzed annie ross’ Pots and Other Living Beings (2019) to continue ongoing discussions pertaining to recent climate strikes. With the upcoming Black Friday sale and holidays next month, I want to suggest a few alternatives for...
A Tribute to Stephen King

A Tribute to Stephen King

To say that Stephen King is a good writer would be an understatement. With nearly 100 books selling over 350 million copies and stories transformed into television series and movies that have left an indelible mark on our pop culture, Stephen King is a capital “G” Great writer. I paid...
Colloquium 2020: Call for Editors!

Colloquium 2020: Call for Editors!

Interested in gaining editing experience? Looking to take part in an enriching academic conference? The ESA is looking for editors to assist with the 2020 Colloquium! Editors will have a hand in selecting the pieces that will be presented at the conference, as well as work closely with those selected...
Society’s Biggest Joke: Put on a Happy Face

Society’s Biggest Joke: Put on a Happy Face

Both heroes and anti-heroes share a common goal in life to find his or her form of happiness by conquering any problem he or she faces to achieve his or her goal. In Todd Phillips’ film, Joker (2019), the audience is challenged to perceive the protagonist Arthur Fleck, a party clown and...
The Strength To Move Mountains

The Strength To Move Mountains

Literature provides us with some of the strongest women in the history of fiction. The connections that form between the reader and the characters can be felt on a deep and personal level. But what does it mean for a female character to be “strong”? What and how can we...
The Burden of Being: Exhaustion as Praxis in ‘Intersectional’ Academia

The Burden of Being: Exhaustion as Praxis in ‘Intersectional’ Academia

UBC is an alarmingly inaccessible campus. It was when I began my undergraduate degree on crutches, it continued to be when I transitioned to a cane, and occasionally still is now that I am mobility-aid free in my daily life. Navigating the campus as a freshman is difficult enough, but when...
Deadly Diction: Examining Emerging Medical Anxieties in “The Body-Snatcher”

Deadly Diction: Examining Emerging Medical Anxieties in “The Body-Snatcher”

Part of the appeal of studying literature in university is bearing witness to the human experience through the centuries. Victorian gothic literature explores a variety of emerging anxieties, and the emergence of medicine as both a profession and an authority throughout the nineteenth century became intertwined with gothic literature. Laurence...
"Ink and Red Dye": How Poe 'Fridges' His Women

“Ink and Red Dye”: How Poe ‘Fridges’ His Women

“The death, then, of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.” — Edgar Allan Poe, The Poetic Principle  Poe’s treatment of women, throughout his stories, can be directly tied back to this claim and its implication that women’s lives are determined and valued based on their...
Submit to the 2020 Colloquium!

Submit to the 2020 Colloquium!

The English Students’ Association is officially calling for submissions to our sixth annual conference, The Colloquium! This conference features presentations from English undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members. The Colloquium offers the opportunity to share your work and discuss ideas with other students and faculty members in the English...
"A salvatory of green mummy": John Webster and Corpse Medicine

“A salvatory of green mummy”: John Webster and Corpse Medicine

Jacobean dramatist John Webster approached the taboo and the questionable with inexhaustible determination, plunging the contemporary reader into those dark, uncomfortable spaces we prefer to skirt around, never lingering for too long for fear of what we might uncover. For Webster, a preoccupation with the gruesome side of mortality manifests...
Latest entries
Destiny and Free Will: The Wicked Day of Chance

Destiny and Free Will: The Wicked Day of Chance

  Death closes all: but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods. — Lord Alfred Tennyson, “Ulysses”   Fate’s threads entangle all in an infinite web, unbeknownst to the players of the tragedy. What happens when a character is aware of his...
ESA Elections 2019!

ESA Elections 2019!

Looking for a fun opportunity to get involved with the English undergraduate community while developing leadership skills? We are officially seeking executives for next year’s ESA.
Betwixt and between psychoanalysis and liminal theory: A liminal approach to Neil Gaiman’s Coraline

Betwixt and between psychoanalysis and liminal theory: A liminal approach to Neil Gaiman’s Coraline

Within the liminal phase, Coraline finds herself in what Turner coins as “a ‘moment in and out of time’” (The Ritual Process 96), in which spatio-temporal boundaries and the constraints of state no longer apply when there are no boundaries or states to be had in the first place.
Why I Chose to Study English and What I Have Learned

Why I Chose to Study English and What I Have Learned

To me, it seemed that writing was magical, borderless; writers had the power to transcend history and reach across different nations, affecting a multitude of people.
4 Colour Commentary: Images of Racism in a 1950s American Comic Book

4 Colour Commentary: Images of Racism in a 1950s American Comic Book

EC Comics, perhaps best-known today as the company behind Mad Magazine, spent the 1950s producing some of the most subversive and contentious comic books in history.  These comics were remarkably cognizant of the social issues of their time, containing parabolic stories that dealt with anti-Semitism and Jim Crow laws while Batman was still trading blows...
The 5th Annual Colloquium: Presenters and Abstracts

The 5th Annual Colloquium: Presenters and Abstracts

The English Students’ Association is excited to present our fifth annual Colloquium! This conference will feature presentations from English undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members. It provides a great opportunity for those in the department to share their work and research. Download our event agenda by clicking here. Paper copies will also be distributed...