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Posts tagged "Aiden Tait"
Transgressive social mobility in Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood”

Transgressive social mobility in Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood”

“Once upon a time, deep in the heart of the country,” begins Charles Perrault, “there lived a pretty little girl whose mother adored her, and her grandmother adored her even more. This good woman made her a red hood like the ones that fine ladies wear when they go riding. The hood suited the child...
"A salvatory of green mummy": John Webster and Corpse Medicine

“A salvatory of green mummy”: John Webster and Corpse Medicine

Jacobean dramatist John Webster approached the taboo and the questionable with inexhaustible determination, plunging the contemporary reader into those dark, uncomfortable spaces we prefer to skirt around, never lingering for too long for fear of what we might uncover. For Webster, a preoccupation with the gruesome side of mortality manifests particularly strongly in his references...
Aconite and mandrake: Crypto-pharmacological botanicals in Shakespeare

Aconite and mandrake: Crypto-pharmacological botanicals in Shakespeare

Don’t try these remedies at home, kids, no matter how reputable Shakespeare’s local apothecary might seem.
Festival Dionysia: A Review

Festival Dionysia: A Review

A cacophony settled by stillness, despair tempered by hope, Festival Dionysia lays bare the humanity of its characters and its audience. In a whirlwind of motion and storylines, six plays come together to celebrate the truly brilliant platform that is the UBC Players Club.
“The Loveliest Lies of All”: Adapting Folk and Fairy Tale Functions in "Over the Garden Wall"

“The Loveliest Lies of All”: Adapting Folk and Fairy Tale Functions in “Over the Garden Wall”

“If dreams can’t come true, then why not pretend?” asks the narrator of Patrick McHale’s animated series Over the Garden Wall, offering a partially hopeful, partially haunting message to guide the viewer through the whimsical, eerie, and complex process and history of adapting folk and fairy tales.
Betwixt and between psychoanalysis and liminal theory: A liminal approach to Neil Gaiman’s Coraline

Betwixt and between psychoanalysis and liminal theory: A liminal approach to Neil Gaiman’s Coraline

Within the liminal phase, Coraline finds herself in what Turner coins as “a ‘moment in and out of time’” (The Ritual Process 96), in which spatio-temporal boundaries and the constraints of state no longer apply when there are no boundaries or states to be had in the first place.