The UBC English Students' Association. Whether you're Lit or Lang, a Major or Minor, we're here for you.
“You, Who Have Devastated the Souls of the Living”: Heroes, Hubris, and the Victorian Gothic in Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas and Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

“You, Who Have Devastated the Souls of the Living”: Heroes, Hubris, and the Victorian Gothic in Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas and Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

Although Christmas time and ghost stories seem to us strange bedfellows, the two were commonly found lying together in the nineteenth century. Ghouls and ghosts, seances and mystics, changelings and revenants were all immensely popular among the Victorians – and their presence was felt year-round in high society. Christmas was...
Transgressive social mobility in Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood”

Transgressive social mobility in Charles Perrault’s “Little Red Riding Hood”

“Once upon a time, deep in the heart of the country,” begins Charles Perrault, “there lived a pretty little girl whose mother adored her, and her grandmother adored her even more. This good woman made her a red hood like the ones that fine ladies wear when they go riding....
LITERATURE TO LIFE: WE EAT TOO MANY PAPER PLATES

LITERATURE TO LIFE: WE EAT TOO MANY PAPER PLATES

Thinking beyond ourselves has become a dominant theme in my Canadian Environmental writing course that influences my decisions on a day-to-day basis. It is annie ross’ collection of poems from Pots and Other Living Beings(2019) that inspires me to reflect on my consumption of food, clothing, and other materialistic items. I...
Literature to Life: Three Timeless Must-Know Gift-Giving Tips You Need

Literature to Life: Three Timeless Must-Know Gift-Giving Tips You Need

From my previous post “Literature to Life: We Eat Too Many Paper Plates,” I analyzed annie ross’ Pots and Other Living Beings (2019) to continue ongoing discussions pertaining to recent climate strikes. With the upcoming Black Friday sale and holidays next month, I want to suggest a few alternatives for...
A Tribute to Stephen King

A Tribute to Stephen King

To say that Stephen King is a good writer would be an understatement. With nearly 100 books selling over 350 million copies and stories transformed into television series and movies that have left an indelible mark on our pop culture, Stephen King is a capital “G” Great writer. I paid...
Colloquium 2020: Call for Editors!

Colloquium 2020: Call for Editors!

Interested in gaining editing experience? Looking to take part in an enriching academic conference? The ESA is looking for editors to assist with the 2020 Colloquium! Editors will have a hand in selecting the pieces that will be presented at the conference, as well as work closely with those selected...
Society’s Biggest Joke: Put on a Happy Face

Society’s Biggest Joke: Put on a Happy Face

Both heroes and anti-heroes share a common goal in life to find his or her form of happiness by conquering any problem he or she faces to achieve his or her goal. In Todd Phillips’ film, Joker (2019), the audience is challenged to perceive the protagonist Arthur Fleck, a party clown and...
The Strength To Move Mountains

The Strength To Move Mountains

Literature provides us with some of the strongest women in the history of fiction. The connections that form between the reader and the characters can be felt on a deep and personal level. But what does it mean for a female character to be “strong”? What and how can we...
The Burden of Being: Exhaustion as Praxis in ‘Intersectional’ Academia

The Burden of Being: Exhaustion as Praxis in ‘Intersectional’ Academia

UBC is an alarmingly inaccessible campus. It was when I began my undergraduate degree on crutches, it continued to be when I transitioned to a cane, and occasionally still is now that I am mobility-aid free in my daily life. Navigating the campus as a freshman is difficult enough, but when...
Deadly Diction: Examining Emerging Medical Anxieties in “The Body-Snatcher”

Deadly Diction: Examining Emerging Medical Anxieties in “The Body-Snatcher”

Part of the appeal of studying literature in university is bearing witness to the human experience through the centuries. Victorian gothic literature explores a variety of emerging anxieties, and the emergence of medicine as both a profession and an authority throughout the nineteenth century became intertwined with gothic literature. Laurence...
"Ink and Red Dye": How Poe 'Fridges' His Women

“Ink and Red Dye”: How Poe ‘Fridges’ His Women

“The death, then, of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.” — Edgar Allan Poe, The Poetic Principle  Poe’s treatment of women, throughout his stories, can be directly tied back to this claim and its implication that women’s lives are determined and valued based on their...
Submit to the 2020 Colloquium!

Submit to the 2020 Colloquium!

The English Students’ Association is officially calling for submissions to our sixth annual conference, The Colloquium! This conference features presentations from English undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members. The Colloquium offers the opportunity to share your work and discuss ideas with other students and faculty members in the English...
"A salvatory of green mummy": John Webster and Corpse Medicine

“A salvatory of green mummy”: John Webster and Corpse Medicine

Jacobean dramatist John Webster approached the taboo and the questionable with inexhaustible determination, plunging the contemporary reader into those dark, uncomfortable spaces we prefer to skirt around, never lingering for too long for fear of what we might uncover. For Webster, a preoccupation with the gruesome side of mortality manifests...
Latest entries
Aconite and mandrake: Crypto-pharmacological botanicals in Shakespeare

Aconite and mandrake: Crypto-pharmacological botanicals in Shakespeare

Don’t try these remedies at home, kids, no matter how reputable Shakespeare’s local apothecary might seem.
Celebrating Women in Literature

Celebrating Women in Literature

Although many women have not received adequate acknowledgement or recognition for their works, their ideas and writings continue to be fundamental.
Galileo in a Different Light

Galileo in a Different Light

Brecht created the character of Galileo to reflect on the actual scientist’s impact in the past and the world as we know it today, exemplifying how a great discovery does not always mean change for the better.
Festival Dionysia: A Review

Festival Dionysia: A Review

A cacophony settled by stillness, despair tempered by hope, Festival Dionysia lays bare the humanity of its characters and its audience. In a whirlwind of motion and storylines, six plays come together to celebrate the truly brilliant platform that is the UBC Players Club.
“The Loveliest Lies of All”: Adapting Folk and Fairy Tale Functions in "Over the Garden Wall"

“The Loveliest Lies of All”: Adapting Folk and Fairy Tale Functions in “Over the Garden Wall”

“If dreams can’t come true, then why not pretend?” asks the narrator of Patrick McHale’s animated series Over the Garden Wall, offering a partially hopeful, partially haunting message to guide the viewer through the whimsical, eerie, and complex process and history of adapting folk and fairy tales.
A Little Wonder for a Frantic Soul: Faye Hanson’s Picture Book "The Wonder"

A Little Wonder for a Frantic Soul: Faye Hanson’s Picture Book “The Wonder”

After I read The Wonder, which is written and wonderfully (pun intended) illustrated by Faye Hanson, the word “wonder” has spiralled into a complex living, breathing creature which harbours unfathomable potential under its layers of fur.